Wednesday, November 6, 2013

IWSG First Person You Say

Greetings all my friends. November already and time for the Insecure Writers Support Group post created by Alex J. Cavanuagh. We post the first Wednesday of the month.

Copyright 2013

Today I'm talking comfort. In your writing that is.

What voice best suits you? Do you switch it up?

My best voice is 3rd person. However, I have a short story series I'm working on that must be 1st person. Everything is viewed from my heroine's point of view because she is unique. She is a phoenix. So not only am I writing in 1st person, out of my comfort zone, but I'm writing from the view point of a bird.

Problem:

Oh yeah, there's a problem. I struggle so much with 1st person. The writing is much slower then I want it to be. I struggle, write something, delete what I wrote, write something else, delete that, until I finally figure out what the single most important thing to my character is in that particular story. Add to this that I'm traveling through real history and putting her in various locations and you have maximum stress. Why?

Why? Because I'm comfortable making up new worlds and inventing monsters that aren't real. History, while I love it, and sticking a fictional character into it, and having something worth your time to tell, are difficult for me.

Nevertheless. This character introduced herself to me and her story must be told.

Can you relate? Let me know.
Nancy

To read other IWSG post go here.

Curious about my short story series. Here is an excerpt.

Anastasia Phoenix, Book 1, Capture.

Chapter 1

Fine spun silver reflected the spring sunlight. I angled my head slightly to study it. A shiny silver aura glowed from the metal, untarnished by recent handling. Sparkling jewels and precious metals fascinated me. I, who have the entire world as my treasure, desire the beautiful things that come from within it. I wondered who’d lost the necklace? A gentle woman, no doubt, but it must have been some time ago since I didn’t detect her scent or see her imprint on the metal. I knew the danger man posed to our kind. We stayed clear. Even studying men had risks. If one of them caught me, I might be plucked like a hen, or worse. Still, there was no scent of man nearby.

I waited. The heart of the forest throbbed to a rhythm that I saw as well as felt. The trees glowed in their natural aura of browns and greens. The nearby pond issued little blue bubbles that broke just above the calm water. A single fish leapt from the pond and caught a fly, their essence becoming one before my eyes. No wild beast drew near, not even the stag that bore fourteen prongs on his magnificent antlers. The scents of boar and fox were strong, but I didn’t see them.

Satisfied I was alone I lifted from the treetop and spread my brilliant red wings gliding toward the ground and the silver necklace. Landing, I rested my claws in the soft grass within pecking distance of the metal. Each silver link had been finely crafted, glistening in the light, drawing me closer. My left claw touched the cool metal.

A flash of green light and a single word, “capture.” Instantly the silver lifted from the ground and ensnared me. I thrashed, unable to spread my wings, unable to throw off the silver that was not a necklace at all. A man arose from behind a bush. He wore a fox pelt over his head. He rushed at me. I knew he must be a wizard since the enchanted silver had trapped me.

He grabbed my body, wrapping me even tighter in the silver, yanking out my golden tail feather. Without it, my magic weakened. I couldn’t summon the fire.

He said, “I am Lloyd, your master.”

I have no master, I wanted to say. But without my golden feather, the words failed me and my cry was no more than a screech.

Copyright 2013
To be released Dec. 2013
All rights reserved.
N. R. Williams
 

12 comments:

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

I've never written one in first person. It wouldn't be comfortable for me either. I guess things like that make us stretch as writers.

Isis Rushdan said...

First person doesn't have to be slower. I've read some fast-paced stories written in first person. I'm not comfortable with it because I don't think a story must be told in first person. It's just what some readers have come to expect with certain genres.

Good luck.

N. R. Williams said...

Hi Alex
We do need to stretch.

Hi Isis
I guess you didn't understand Isis. The story isn't slow, I am.

Thank you both for stopping in.
Nancy

Mel Chesley said...

I have yet to write anything in first person. Perhaps it might be fun to do just to get an idea of it all. Who knows, maybe I'll like it.
Good luck!

Lexa Cain said...

I don't like to write in first even though it's easier - so many inner thoughts and much less description. But everyone has different experiences. First seems to be working for you. Keep on writing! :-)

N. R. Williams said...

It's a challenge Mel.

I hope so Lexa.

Thanks for stopping by.
Nancy

Michelle Wallace said...

I think it's important to at least try writing a piece in the first person, even if it's only to experiment... try something different... grow as a writer...
I write in third person. It's comfortable.

Southpaw said...

Most everything I've written is in third with one POV.

The last one was in 1st and it was hard. I'm still editing and fiddling it because even small things go out of whack if it's not in the MCs mind.

Now, I'm doing a third again, but with alternating POV. Yipes!

It's not so much that I;m experimenting, but more that the stories need to told that way. Ya, know?

Anna Nordeman said...

First person means that there is hope that the main character will survive his or her ordeal.
Can't wait to read it!
Best wishes,
Anna

N. R. Williams said...

Hi Michelle
Absolutely correct. We need to grow as writers.

Hi Holly
Multiple POV can be tricky, but I do love knowing what is in the head of more than one character.

Hi Anna
I will let you all know when I publish.

Thanks everyone for stopping by and leaving a comment.
Nancy

Pat Tillett said...

If a person uses too many "I" and "me" words in real life, they sound (or are) narcissistic. We all know some, right? Having said that, if the main character in a book has an interesting thought process, first person is the best way to demonstrate it. Maybe the only way. I'm not talking about what they do, I'm talking about what they think.

N. R. Williams said...

Hi Pat
You're correct.
Nancy